Phom

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick
What Remains © Sarker Protick

What Remains © Sarker Protick

Sarker Protick is an artist born in Dacca, Bangladesh, in 1986. While studying marketing he delved into photography, and later enrolled at the South Asian Institute of Photography, in Pathshala. In 2014 he was among the “Ones to watch” recommended by the British Journal of Photography, and was selected for the Joop Swart Masterclass. With the project What remains he won the World Press Photo 2015. His work has appeared, among others, on the New York times, GEO Magazine, New Yorker, Libération, National Geographic, Wired, and has been exhibited within many international festivals. In 2016 he collaborated with Katrin Koenning for his first book, Astres Noirs. Since 2015 he’s a member of VII, and he teaches in the same institute where he studied.

For the project What Remains Sarker Protick has been photographing his grandparents, John and Prova, during their old age. The series originated from the need to strengthen an already strong relationship, that however had been weakened by time and routine. Both John and Prova started suffering from severe health conditions and were forced to spend most of the time in their old flat. The memory of his grandparents when they were younger and healthier suddenly feels distant, and their home seems to deteriorate along with them: «As time went by it shaped everything in it’s own way. Bodies took different forms and relations went distant. Grandma’s hair turned gray, the walls started peeling off. Objects, letters, old photographs were all that remained.»
Sarker started and continued photographing them for a year. Their relationship strengthened and renovated itself: being photographed this way has been a new experience and was a means for the photographer to spend more time with them. In 2012 Prova died, and the project come to an interruption. Sarker kept on visiting his grandfather, without photographing him: «I visited John more so he could talk. He tells me stories of their early life, and how they met and so on. Here, life is silent, suspended. Everything is on a wait.»
As already seen in the broader project Of River and Lost Lands, Protick’s documentary approach expands into something more personal and impalpable. What Remains has a very subtle way to tell, not exactly a story, perhaps a physical condition: most of all it’s the narration of a distance. The flow of time and everyday actions are crystallised within a suspended light, captured through a controlled overexposure: in these photographs, people, spaces and objects seem to give back the light that was originally recorded by the camera.

What Remains has been exhibited on many occasions, some of which featuring installations of archive materials. Origin, Protick’s new project that it’s still ongoing, is comprised of light installations, sound, and large format photographs.

 

Gabriele Magazzù

 

Leave a Reply